The Frustrations of the Chase

We just returned from a brief stay in Florida where we went ZERO FOR EVERYTHING when trying to find new birds!

To be fair, none of the birds we were trying to see was a staked out rarity. In fact, none of the reports we followed was even very recent, and all seem to have been one day wonders; no one other than the original reporter has reported the bird again. But it is still very frustrating to spend so much time and effort and come up completely empty.

After spending a few days visiting Renee’s mother in Sarasota, we decided to take a couple of days to look for a selection of Florida specialties that we missed during our Big Year. All of the birds we targeted had been seen in the past few weeks but none were being seen regularly. Indeed, some of the species are quite rare, so we had fairly low expectations. We were hoping to see two of the six target species. Instead, we saw none.

Our first target was Bahama Mockingbird. Several had been seen during the spring but the latest reports were at least 10 days old. Still, we figured that it was worth a shot, since these are notorious skulkers and they might be overlooked. The nearest report to where we were staying in Sarasota was a bird seen at Leffis Key near Bradenton Beach. We tried for that bird, but the weather was hot, hot, hot and we had no luck. The only birds we saw in the area were Northern Mockingbird, Fish Crow, and Laughing Gull.

Our next target was Smooth-billed Ani. This bird was seen near Belle Glade, about three hours from Sarasota, so we drove down to spend a day in that area. The search seemed promising at first, but again weather provided some obstacles, this time in the form of wind and rain. After getting soaked (despite my rain gear) I decided to call it quits and try elsewhere.

The following morning found us at Juno Dunes Natural Area, just south of Jupiter, FL. The target here was a female Bananaquit that had been seen about a week prior (with no follow-up reports). We found the area to be interesting and the birding was fun, but the “quit” did not make an appearance. It was a very long shot to begin with, so we were not too surprised or discouraged by the results.

For the rest of our stay in the area we tried multiple locations for the supposedly more common specialties: Purple Swamphen, Spot-breasted Oriole, and exotic parrots (with one long-shot stop to visit an area where flamingoes had been reported in the fairly distant past). At each stop, we were often encouraged by the habitat but always discouraged by the lack of birds. I did hear a suspected swamphen at one location (the pond at City Furniture in Tamarac) but was not certain of the id. In most cases, the needle in a haystack phenomenon as definitely at play.

Perhaps the biggest frustration was the fact that during our stay in Florida (and before that in North Carolina) rare birds continued to show up in the places we had left. We left Texas in April and Yellow-green Vireo and Green Violetear showed up in May and June. I had been in Arizona in April but the Buff-collared Nightjar and Yellow Grosbeak did not show up until May and June. (The grosbeak added insult to injury by being found within five miles of our place in Rodeo, NM!) It seems the rarities are only being found where we are NOT.

The lesson of this is, obviously, that I need to be more active at chasing the rarities, no matter where they may be. But that takes more time and money than I care to spend at the present time. Once we sell our home in Texas and can spend more time on the road, I’ll try to rectify that. Let’s just hope that the birds are there, somewhere, in the future.